All posts by admin

Plane Old Networks

This is a catchall post to collect together a number of interesting network images I’ve run across in the last few years. The common feature is that they are all networks that are based in or arise from geography or spatial processes. Unlike most of the networks we often have to work with, these are mostly “planar” (or nearly so) meaning that they can usually be drawn in two dimensions with minimal crossing and distortion.

The map itself

In The Network Analysis of Urban Streets: a Dual Approach Sergio Porta, Paolo Crucitti and Vito Latora convert city streets to networks and examine some of their properties. Figure 2 of the paper below

The six 1-square mile samples of urban patterns (above) and their primal graphs (below): 1. Ahmedabad; 2. Barcelona; 3. San Francisco; 4. Venezia; 5. Wien; 6. Walnut Creek. Cities are so diverse that, at a first sight, it seems hard to imagine that they share any common — though hidden — pattern, which is what they actually do.

Continue reading Plane Old Networks

Adventures with J. P. Morgan and Form 13F

Image of J.P. Morgan Chase & Co's Q42010 security ownership network

Inspired in part by recent work for a client, I finally got around to pulling a long night to play with some Form 13F data from the SEC. This pdf image shows significant ownership relations for J. P. Morgan at the end of 2010. Or at least I think it does. I’d love to hear from anyone who knows more about these types of financial filings.
Continue reading Adventures with J. P. Morgan and Form 13F

Are Your Cookies Colluding?

I recently installed Mozilla’s Collusion add-on for Firefox. It maps out the set of information-sharing relationships between sites as you visit them and they install various 3rd-party-cookies to track your browsing history. Has a neat interactive network viz as a browser plugin where so you can highlight sites you’ve visit and who they reported to.

This image was after a week of low-intensity computer use. Not that surprising to see Google, Facebook and Twitter as very central nodes, tho still impressive to have an image of how many sites report to them. Some sites like quantserve.com I’d at least heard of before, but not some of the other central stats players like 2o7.net or media6degrees.com or imrworldwide.com that appeared lurking in the network.

The visualization seems to be built in SVG using the D3 library’s network code. The interactivity and design are quite lovely, at least for small networks. However, now that I’ve been running Collusion for a month, the graph is quite large and the animation is getting painfully slow and eating my CPU.

NYT Network Narrative

The folks at the New York Times continue to produce awesome data visualisations for their stories. Recently they’ve been splitting production to produce both print (above) and online interactive versions (below) of their figures. This is great, because it makes it possible to design for the strengths and weaknesses of each medium. The interactive version of the the Overview of the Euro Debt Crises viz is also really nice because the the column on the left allows selective hi-lighting of different elments of the network corresponding to various parts of the narrative. And its all in SVG! (via Ronald Rice)

Angels of the Right – version 2.0

I’ve been working for the past several months to build AngelsOfTheRight.net a new interactive version of the conservative philanthropy network data from the Media Matters Conservative Transparency Project and other sources. The idea is to have an atlas where you can dive in, explore, and see which organisations have similar patterns of funding relationships. As always, my hope is to make some of these invisible economic and power relationships a bit more tangible.
Continue reading Angels of the Right – version 2.0

Tracking the funding for Proposition 23

Guess who is pumping in the money to support CA Proposition 23 to roll back California’s global warming legislation?
thumbnail of prop23 network map
Yup, mostly its the companies that would be regulated when the law goes into effect. I’ve been working for the past few weeks to build prop23.dirtyenergymoney.com, an interactive network chart of the funding flows. Its an adaptation of our previous dirty energy money site, but using campaign finance data from California, and from OpenSecrets.org for the Federal PACs that are contributing in California. I think it is interesting to see the multiple layers, how the various group funnel in money and influence. I hope to be able to do an expanded version which would also show some of the other strings that Koch is pulling, why Chevron isn’t investing in Prop 23 (it seems they are backing 25 & 26 instead), and the the backers of the various No on 23 campaigns.

Also, can anyone help me figure out what happened to the $5000 contribution from Western Petroleum Marketer’s Association? It was in an earlier version of the data, but now seems to be missing from the filings. It seems that Tesoro may have solicited support for Prop 23 in their meetings, and I’d like to be able to include them.

Update: We’ve added panning and zooming features on the graph. We’ve also done a second chart for CA Proposition 26: prop26.dirtyenergymoney.com